All posts tagged: Musings

On 100 Days of Blogging

What happened when I blogged for 100 days straight? It felt incredible, first of all. I am proud that I took it on and committed to it, even with travel plans looming ahead. I’ve written previously about my feelings when I completed a hundred posts and my reasons for blogging. This felt like more of an accomplishment because it needed more discipline.   It wasn’t always easy. There were days when motivation was lacking. On these days, I took a quick break to unwind either on my art table or with a book or TV. I planned for days when I knew I would be away from my desk and scheduled posts to auto-publish – posts like this one! I had stopped working after my son was born. As most non-working parents would experience, it is tough to have a sense of accomplishment at the end of the day. The laundry’s still piling up, the house is a mess, you’ve barely managed to feed everyone, and you’re exhausted by the end of the day. It feels …

painting of a woman

On Validation Seeking

Have you ever said (or heard someone say) “I don’t care what the world thinks. I do what I want, and I don’t need the world’s approval.” This sentence is usually followed by a smug look, especially when others nod in awe. This person has just received approval and validation for feeling like they don’t need it. Seeking validation is human nature and essential to being a part of society. We are constantly seeking approval from people around us. It gives us a sense of belonging. A slight nod of appreciation or a Like on a social media post makes us smile and stand a bit taller with a little sense of accomplishment. Some harmless peacocking is good for the ego, but how do we know if it gets out of hand—when seeking approval turns into becoming dependent on approvals?  In light of some investigative revelations that Facebook’s research showed the mental harm of social media on teenagers, it’s worthwhile to reassess our reasons for seeking approval. Constant exposure to the extravagant ‘lifestyle influencers’ makes …

packed boxes piled on top of each other

On the Move: Shifting Homes

How many times have you shifted your home in your lifetime? Even shifting houses in the same city counts. Do you have the numbers of movers and packers on speed dial? I have shifted houses about 22 times in my 41 years – as far as I can remember. This also includes coming back to the same place after a move. The longest I’ve stayed in the same house is six years, and the shortest is about seven months. I’d say this makes me quite an expert in packing and unpacking tasks. I’m very organised. There are times when I wish I had stayed put in one place and developed a group of friends that have known me for a lifetime. On the other hand, the personal growth I’ve experienced because of all the shifting is immeasurable. I also feel it has helped me not get too attached to a single place so that I am free to follow opportunities for growth and happiness. Advantages of Shifting Houses It’s an excellent opportunity to declutter. When …

art installation at the Louvre paris of a woman with a large pile of clothes

What a Waste: How to be a Conscious Consumer

Do you think twice about the stuff you buy? I’m not just talking about the price factor, but also the value of the product in how it will enrich your life and the product’s life cycle. Do the resources utilised in the making then disposing of it justify its use? Conscious consumerism in India and the world is on the rise. As festive sales are being heavily advertised, it’s a good time to reflect on how you can be a more conscious consumer. Conscious Consumption Definition What is conscious consumerism? As the name suggests, any consumer of products who, along with price and quality, also considers these products’ social and environmental impact. A product’s life cycle, from production to disposal, is as strong an influence on consumers’ purchasing decisions as to its need. The Rise of Conscious Consumerism The consumer model is slowly shifting. Many customers want to focus on conscious consumerism—a buying practice driven by a commitment to making purchasing decisions with a positive environmental, economic, and social impact.  More people want to buy …

On Persistence

This right here is my hundredth post on the blog! I didn’t think I’d get here in just over two months. I didn’t think I had it in me to be persistent enough or interested enough to follow through. I had wanted to start a blog soon after I had my son. I wanted to talk about things I wished someone had told me about. I also wanted to share my thoughts on a whole bunch of things that randomly cropped up in my head. However, raising a baby, then a toddler is a full day and night job! I just couldn’t muster enough headspace to take on another commitment. However, I jot down points and thoughts I had during that journey, so I didn’t forget whenever I started my blog. These came in handy. It gave me a few almost-ready blog posts to start with and helped me remember things I would’ve otherwise forgotten six years later. One thing that has sustained my persistence is my interest in blogging. I didn’t think I would …

Kid making rotis while his mom supervises

Kids in the Kitchen

I am not fond of cooking. I cook for sustenance or because I happen to be craving something, rarely ever for enjoyment. I first saw the programme Masterchef Australia Kids before I had even thought of having kids. The show gave me a new perspective on how they could be helpful to have! Do men belong in the kitchen? Jokes apart, I was sure I wanted to raise a child who would be self-sufficient and independent. Especially as a mother of a boy in South Asia, I’d did not want him to grow up to be a man-child. I’d seen enough men who couldn’t find their way around a kitchen even to get a glass of water, and the women (mother, wife or sister) who found it funny or exasperating but never did anything to correct that behaviour. My husband has, over time, become pretty proficient in the kitchen. He took up more kitchen duties after our son was born. Our kid has not known a day when his dad hasn’t been part of the …

Card saying happy birthday on top of a black and white striped book and a branch of leaves on the side

On Birthdays

Do you celebrate your birthday? I always have celebrated mine. Sometimes with a big party, and sometimes with just a single cupcake. 
Over the years since then, I have met many people for whom birthdays are no different from any other day. I have also met people who celebrate with all the enthusiasm of a child who’s just realised you get gifts on your birthday.

Ganesha idol made with flour and cloves for eyes. Eco-friendly Ganesha

How do you talk about Religion with your Child?

I remember, as a child, I truly believed Gods exist because of the stories my grandmother told of them and the movies we watched based on them. Even as a child, I looked upon them more as historical figures rather than mystical ones. As a parent, I wouldn’t want to force my opinions and beliefs on my child. He’s free to explore and enjoy all aspects of various religious customs. He’s too young to understand the philosophy behind the meaning of God, but he’ll figure that out eventually. Growing up with religion I grew up in a house that practised many religious customs but was not strictly religious.  Practicality (and convenience) usually won over the rituals. As I grew older, I became more of a realist and stopped believing in mythological stories. I still enjoy them, though.  I was never interested in praying. I am disappointed by people who claim to be devout, but their actions are diametrically opposite of religious teachings of all kinds. I am yet to find a religion that accepts and …

Pets & Kids

I never had pets growing up. I think my parents had their hands full just managing us three sisters.  We got our first pet, a tiny puppy when I was in college. He sadly died within a week. We were all heartbroken. For a long time after that, none of us had the heart to get another dog till one just pawed itself into our lives. We called her April, and we all loved her. Soon, another 4-legged moppet just meowed herself into our home. We loved having them around. They made you feel extra special just by choosing to snuggle next to you. Moreover, the combination of having a dog and a cat co-exist never failed to get a surprised reaction from outsiders. Over the years, they have given us company or a hug whenever we needed them. They have loved and trusted us without reservations. When they passed over the rainbow bridge, we felt their loss. Our only consolation being they lived a good full life. Babies: Human vs Furry When I got …

Living Through a Global Pandemic

I have to say, even in my most paranoid moments, living through a global pandemic was not on my Bingo card. I am not one to get easily frazzled, but this has come close to completely unravelling me multiple times. At the beginning of 2020, I was just adjusting to a new home, my husband to a new office, and our son to a new school. We were dealing with health issues in the extended family, and we had to cancel a few plans. It wasn’t a chirpy start to the year. When reports of a novel virus came pouring in, I was concerned but only from afar. We stopped reading newspapers or watching the news on TV a few years ago, preferring to quickly catch up on events online. Once the virus started spreading, we were cautioned but not anxious. The sudden lockdown in India took everyone by surprise. The weeks that followed were heartbreaking because of the mishandling of it. News from other parts of the world was even more distressing.  Every day …